Executive Vice President



Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President

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Most governments with vice presidents have one person in this role at any time, although in some countries there are two or more vice presidents–an extreme case being Iran's 12 vice presidents. If the president is not present, dies, resigns, or is otherwise unable to fulfill their duties, the vice president will generally serve as president. In many presidential systems, the vice president does not wield much day-to-day political power, but is still considered an important member of the cabinet. Some vice presidents in the Americas hold the position of President of the Senate; this is the case, for example, in Argentina, the United States, and Uruguay. The vice president sometimes assumes some of the ceremonial duties of the president, such as attending functions and events that the actual president may be too busy to attend; the Vice President of the United States, for example, often attends funerals of world leaders on behalf of the president. In parliamentary or semi-presidential systems, a vice president may coexist with a Prime Minister, as is the case in India and Namibia, but the presence of both offices concurrently is rare.